verb (used with object), man·aged, man·ag·ing.

to bring about or succeed in accomplishing, sometimes despite difficulty or hardship: She managed to see the governor. How does she manage it on such a small income?

to take charge or care of: to manage my investments.

to dominate or influence (a person) by tact, flattery, or artifice: He manages the child with exemplary skill.

to handle, direct, govern, or control in action or use: She managed the boat efficiently.

to wield (a weapon, tool, etc.).

to handle or train (a horse) in the exercises of the manège.

Archaic. to use sparingly or with judgment, as health or money; husband.

verb (used without object), man·aged, man·ag·ing.

to conduct business, commercial affairs, etc.; be in charge: Who will manage while the boss is away?

to continue to function, progress, or succeed, usually despite hardship or difficulty; get along: How will he manage with his wife gone? It was a rough time, but we managed.

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Origin of manage

1555–65; earlier manege<Italian maneggiare to handle, train (horses), derivative of mano<Latin manus hand

synonym study for manage

OTHER WORDS FROM manage

o·ver·man·age, verb (used with object), o·ver·man·aged, o·ver·man·ag·ing.quasi-managed, adjectiveself-man·ag·ing, adjectiveun·der·man·age, verb (used with object), un·der·man·aged, un·der·man·ag·ing.

un·der·man·aged, adjectiveun·man·aged, adjectivewell-managed, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use manage in a sentence

  • Other countries have managed to keep schools open even while locking everything else down.

  • Becky Weikert Bard, 40, is the managing editor of the Daily News in Huntingdon.

  • Behind a cold front, temperatures may not fall much immediately, managing the mid-50s to near 60 degrees.

  • Her company, which manages more than 2,000 hotel rooms in the Washington region, normally experiences 35 to 40 percent occupancy during the inauguration.

  • Listed as a “ferryman” managing a cross-Potomac boat service owned by his former owner, Posey was probably about 16 when he came to Mount Vernon, Washington’s Virginia estate, which included five farms.

  • The al Qaeda-linked gunmen shot back, but only managed to injure one officer before they were taken out.

  • Then she managed to struggle a mile through dark, rainy woods.

  • Thankfully there were no casualties—the driver managed to stop the train immediately.

  • Weve managed to survive, and I want to be a part of that tradition.

  • Al Qaeda has never managed to carve out a large chunk of real estate to call its own—in Afghanistan it was a guest of the Taliban.

  • Sympathising with its desires, Benjy changed his posture, and managed just to touch the nose of his enemy.

  • And since he was glad enough to do that, Mrs. Robin managed to feed her children all they needed.

  • He staggered along with much difficulty and managed to complete half of it by Christmas.

  • Sometimes he did, although when I saw the worst coming I generally managed to get him over to the ranch.

  • Still the King managed to retain his popularity, and in his own way attempted to ameliorate the lot of his subjects.

British Dictionary definitions for manage


verb (mainly tr)

(also intr) to be in charge (of); administerto manage ones affairs; to manage a shop

to succeed in being able (to do something) despite obstacles; contrivedid you manage to go to sleep?

to have room, time, etc, forcan you manage dinner tomorrow?

to exercise control or domination over, often in a tactful or guileful manner

(intr) to contrive to carry on despite difficulties, esp financial oneshe managed quite well on very little money

to wield or handle (a weapon)

rare to be frugal in the use of

noun

Word Origin for manage

C16: from Italian maneggiare to control, train (esp horses), ultimately from Latin manus hand

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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